Stephen Fuller

Director, Center for Regional Analysis
George Mason University

Stephen Fuller, GMU Center for Regional Analysis Director, Named to Wash100 for GovCon Thought Leadership

Stephen Fuller

Executive Mosaic is honored to unveil Dr. Stephen Fuller, director of the Center for Regional Analysis at George Mason University and Dwight Schar Faculty Chair, as the newest inductee into the Wash100, the premier group of leaders who drive innovation and growth in the public and private sectors.

The two-decade GMU professor focuses much of his research work on how federal spending impacts the Washington area economy and developed a set of metrics to track the area’s current and near-term economic performance.

As an indicator of Fuller’s standing, Fairfax County, Va. sought his help in 1997 to develop a set of indicators for measuring economic activity in the county and in 2006, then-Gov. Tim Kaine appointed Fuller to the Governor’s Advisory Board of Economists.

Kaine was the fourth state governor to name Fuller to that body of advisers as Mark Warner, George Allen and Doug Wilder have also sought Fuller’s perspective.

In May 2013 as sequestration budget cuts began to fall in place, Executive Mosaic called on Fuller to address a group of public and private sector leaders at the Potomac Officers Club‘s “Post-Sequestration Summit.”

There, government and business executives gathered to hear from and exchange ideas with their peers on how to navigate the new budgetary environment created in part by the sequester.

As a primer for that summit, Fuller offered Executive Mosaic’s portfolio a two-part analysis on how Washington and its surrounding localities could weather the storm of sequestration and thrive by expanding to areas outside of GovCon.

(Click here to read part 1 and click here to read part 2).

“Health and education will be a very important piece of that, especially with applications of technology to help care, health services and educational services,” he said.

“Financial services is another small, but strong, sector in the Washington area with substantial growth potential. Washington is becoming much more prominent for electronic trading, electronic financial services and venture capital activities.”

Additionally, Fuller offered advice on how the Washington area can lean on its brand as the nation’s capital but also be known for more than being the home of the federal government.

“The key is to build on our strengths and not to try building an economy that mirrors others but rather recognizes our federal base and extends it into the private sector resulting in the emergence of a global business center wrapped around the world’s governmental focal point,” he says.

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